BREAKING NEWS:

TRAVEL WARNING for Nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen ...Read More

BREAKING NEWS:

Divorce Can Be Inexpensive And Fast ...Read More

BREAKING NEWS:

U.S.C.I.S. Filing Fee Increase & Updated Forms ...Read More

FIRM OVERVIEW

LaFountain & Wollman, P.C. is a general practice law firm located in Watertown, and provides legal services to clients in the Boston metro area and beyond. Our firm structure allows us to represent clients with a diverse range of legal needs, however each matter is assigned to a lawyer who focuses their practice on the specific type of law at issue. When cases involve multiple practice areas, our experienced attorneys utilize collective, but never duplicative efforts to maximize efficiency in a practical, cost effective manner. We always advocate for the best outcome in every matter, and keep our clients informed of all developments and options in their cases. We also minimize the use of non-lawyer assistance, to ensure our clients have direct relationships with their actual attorneys, all of whom respond to client communications in a timely manner.

 

To learn more, please click on the links to our law firm’s practice areas:

Recent Announcements

On January 27, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order which bans nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from entering the United States. Due to the broad wording of this Order and confusion that it has caused, all nationals of the listed seven countries, including legal permanent residents (those with green cards) should not travel outside of the United States as they may be be allowed to re-enter. Please feel free to contact the immigration lawyers at LaFountain & Wollman, P.C. regarding any immigration questions, including questions about how President Trumps Executive Orders will affect you.

Recent Announcements

After a while, many couples both decide they were not “meant to be,” and come to a general understanding on what they want to happen next. When that occurs, quickly getting the process over with can save countless months’ worth of stress, anxiety, uncertainty, agitation, hostility, and discomfort. Even the most amicable of separating couples can find themselves arguing over minor and trivial annoyances when trying to navigate the legal process of their marital dissolution.

Know Someone in This Situation? We Can Help

If you or someone you know is in this situation, we can help bring the marriage to a quick and low-cost resolution. Although we can only represent one spouse in any given divorce under the law, we can help you quickly convert your tentative agreement into a formal divorce agreement for your spouse to review, and can also draft the legal papers that must be filed with it (except for one standard form that must be completed by your spouse – we can give them a blank copy though). Once both sides are in agreement on the legal documents, we get them filed and arrange for a court hearing to finalize the matter.

Same-Day Filing

In one county, we can often get the papers filed and presented to the judge on the same day or even morning!!!!! Again, in some cases we can literally file the completed papers together, and leave court before lunch with the case already resolved. Even in courts where that is not possible, the delay before the hearing is generally not too long when everything is properly filed, and in most cases having the agreement signed and filed will reduce the stress and fighting a great deal during the wait.

We Can Help You Reach A Joint Agreement Faster

Finally, even if there are a few issues in dispute, getting the assistance of counsel to finalize the remaining issues can help reach a joint agreement faster and with less stress than going it alone. This can be done before anyone files for divorce in hopes of doing so together, or it can be done after one side files.

Recent Announcements

As of December 23, 2016, U.S.C.I.S. has increased the filing fees for immigration applications and petitions by an average of 21 percent. Further, new versions of most immigration forms were also released on December 23, 2016 and are to be used in place of older versions.

All immigration applications or immigration petitions postmarked on or after December 23, 2016 must include the new filing fees or U.S.C.I.S. will reject the submission. Pursuant to recent guidance from U.S.C.I.S., older versions of immigration forms will be accepted until February 21, 2017. The new forms can be found at http://www.uscis.gov/forms and information regarding the new immigration filing fees can be found at https://www.uscis.gov/forms/our-fees.

Before you file any immigration applications or immigration petitions, contact LaFountain & Wollman, P.C. to set up a free half-hour consultation with one of our immigration lawyers to review and discuss your immigration status. Remember it is almost always safer, and cheaper, to seek legal advice before filing rather than after a problem arises.

Recent Announcements

Effective April 15, 2016, the Massachusetts Probate and Family Court requires the use of new and revised forms for estate or probate filings. While there will be a two week grace period, older version of the forms will not be accepted for filing thereafter. Information regarding the changes to these forms can be found HERE.

To access the new forms, please visit the FORMS PAGE of the Probate and Family Court. If you have any questions concerning these changes, or any other aspect of an estate or probate matter, please do not hesitate to contact us for a free half hour consultation with our probate attorneys.

Recent Announcements

Sometimes people wonder if they can withhold payment under a contract due to the other party’s breach of the contract. While that is possibly allowed depending on the nature of the breach, the circumstances leading up to it, and the ramifications thereof, not every breach permits such. As the Supreme Judicial Court required potential litigants earlier today in a published decision, refusal of performance (payment) by a non-breaching party will ordinarily require that the breach was “material.” To be “material”, the breach must involve an essential and inducing feature of the contract.

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